The Emory U Lecture – Every Business School Needs an Internet Marketing Course

by Ryan on October 7, 2010

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On Monday, I had the privilege of guest lecturing in two entrepreneurship classes at Emory University’s Goizeuta Business School. Here’s video from the first lecture.  It’s about 1 hour and 20 minutes.  Please pardon the funky camera angle…

And if you’re still awake, here is the video from the first 30 minutes of the 2nd lecture, before the camera ran out of battery life…

During the 2 classes, when I polled the audience, here’s a run down of what they wanted to learn more about:

1.  Adwords / Paid Search – How’s it work?

2.  Monetizing a site with Ads, is tough, what other ways are there to monetize?

3.  How do you come up with good ideas?

4.  How to gain technical expertise – e.g. how the internet, search, and websites work?

5.  Social Me Me Media!  How do you use it to your advantage?

6.  How has a background in accounting helped?

7.  How to get started with a business.  What are the first steps?

8.  How can you attract customers and content providers?

9.  How much does it cost to make an iPhone app?

10.  How to keep content providers happy in the early stages of a business?

What stuck out the most from the experience was how interested the students are in learning about “How to Get Website Traffic“, a topic which I’ve blogged about here before.  This leaded me to believe that every business school should have a class on internet marketing, as an overwhelming majority of the discussion became geared towards paid search, organic SEO, and social media.

Another interesting discovery occurred when I asked the class “How many of you are on Twitter?“, to which only 1 student out of a classroom of around 40, raised their hand.  I’m not sure whether this indicates that Twitter has either (A) a lot of room to grow or (B) it’s peaked. I’m inclined to vote for (B).  When I asked the class “How many of you are on Facebook?”, the entire room nodded in acknowledgement.

During the discussion I provided a list of free resources to help get them started, including TechCrunch, This Week In, and my favorite entrepreneurial / VC blog, BothSidesOfTheTable.

Since the lecture, I’ve had a number of students follow up with me seeking advice.  I’m very excited by the opportunity to give back to the community by helping them get their businesses off the ground and on the right track. Thanks to Andrea Hershatter for allowing me the opportunity to speak to her class.  I am truly honored to have been a part of their business school experience.  It’s the least that I could do to give back the the institution that has help me so much in my own career.

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